Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7544
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dc.contributor.authorISYAKU, Farida-
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-24T14:03:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-03-24T14:03:36Z-
dc.date.issued2015-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/123456789/7544-
dc.descriptionA THESIS SUBMITTED TO THE SCHOOL OF POSTGRADUATE STUDIES AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE AWARD OF A MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY, FACULTY OF SCIENCE, AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY, ZARIA, NIGERIA.en_US
dc.description.abstractHealthcare services are aimed at improving wellbeing and preventing potential human health risks and environmental hazards. In the process, however, wastes that are potentially harmful are generated. Poor management of these healthcare wastes (HCW) exposes the health workers, patients, waste handlers and the general public to health risks. Thus, this study focussed on the assessment of HCW management practices at Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH) Zaria and Ahmadu Bello University Health Service (ABUHS) A.B.U. Zaria. The study utilised two sets of questionnaire to capture HCW management practices including collection, segregation, storage, disposal and treatment. One of the set of questionnaire was administered to all the waste handlers while the second set of questionnaire was administered to all the heads of waste management units in each of the hospitals. While the former was used for identifying the HCW management practices in the two hospitals, the latter was used for assessing the effectiveness of HCW management practices in the hospitals in accordance with Townend and Cheeseman (2005) guidelines. The study established the total quantities of HCW generated at ABUTH and ABUHS as 845kg and 77kg per day respectively; which translates to 1.18kg and 1.54kg per day per bed at ABUTH and ABUHS respectively. The study revealed availability of operational staff specifically responsible for medical waste management and personal protective equipment for use by medical waste handlers in both ABUTH and ABUHS. The study further revealed availability of receptacles, storage containers, dumpsites and separation of collection of sharps or infectious materials at both ABUTH and ABUHS. The study, however, also established absence of colour coding, central purpose-built storage facility, recycling on healthcare waste management in both ABUTH and ABUHS. It was concluded that both the ABUTH and ABUHS are classified as Level 2 hospitals based on their operational performance in accordance with the Townend and Cheeseman (2005) guidelines, which implies that some aspects are considered sustainable while some other aspects considered unsustainable. The study recommended more sustainable practices in the management of HCW. Given the importance of effective healthcare waste management practices and the current unsustainable level of performance, the study recommended further study on the effects of the healthcare wastes from the two hospitals on the environment (soil, water and air). Williamsen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectASSESSMENT,en_US
dc.subjectMEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES,en_US
dc.subjectAHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL,en_US
dc.subjectAHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES,en_US
dc.subjectZARIA,en_US
dc.subjectNIGERIA,en_US
dc.titleASSESSMENT OF MEDICAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY TEACHING HOSPITAL AND AHMADU BELLO UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES, ZARIA, NIGERIAen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
Appears in Collections:ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN



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